Junior Harmon Ball Field Re-Dedication Ceremony

Sunday July 14, 2019 4:45PM (or 15min before the U12 Championship Game)

Jr Harmon Ball Field is hosting the Maine State Babe Ruth Softball Championships this weekend, Friday July 12th – Sunday July 14th.  Before the U12 Championship game on Sunday, July 14th, there will be a re-dedication ceremony to recognize the completion of the Jr Harmon Ball Field renovations as well as recognize Jr Harmon for the all the years he spent on the field as a coach, and as the volunteer that prepped the field for the local baseball league for years.

Bridgton Recreation Department will present his family with the original “Jr Harmon Field” sign to keep as a memento to Junior.  One of Junior’s family members will throw out the first pitch before the 12 and Under championship game. This will take place, if there is no weather delays, at 4:45PM at Junior Harmon Ball Field.

We would like to invite all of you down to the Ball Field on Sunday to be a part of the ceremony, maybe watch a great championship game, eat a burger and some fries from the newly renovated snack shack, and check out all the updates at the Ball Field. The Bridgton News plans to attend and get great pictures of the event and the more people the better!!

A big thanks to Public Works, Jeff Frye, Eric Wisseman, Main Line Fencing, and everyone else for of the hours put into this field all spring. Their flexibility, ability to work together, and attention to detail is why this project met its deadlines to be completed for this big league State Tournament weekend!!

Gary Colello
Bridgton Director of Recreation
Andy Valley Softball President
rec@bridgtonmaine.org
207-647-1126

Joint Press Release – Salmon Point Road Settlement Agreement

The Town of Bridgton and the residents of Salmon Point Road are pleased to announce that they have reached a solution to resolve the pending litigation at Salmon Point Road.

The Town of Bridgton has constructed a public footpath parallel to the private portion of Salmon Point Road, physically separated from the private way by a split-rail fence, that will offer safe access to the public beaches at Salmon Point from the available public parking. In conjunction with the recently finished public parking lot, the footpath is part of the Town of Bridgton’s ongoing commitment to improving access to public resources and protecting the historic use and rights of local residents as more people discover the allure and natural beauty of Bridgton’s beaches and lakes.

As shown below, the path extends from the public parking lot adjacent to Salmon Point Campground to the public beaches at Salmon Point and will be maintained by the Town of Bridgton for this purpose. Further, signage will be posted directing visitors to use the footpath. As a result, both residents and visitors at Salmon Point will continue to enjoy access to the beauty of Salmon Point and Long Lake as we head into the summer season.

The Town has completed the gravel path so that visitors can safely access the public beaches and Salmon Point. In addition, new signage will be erected by the Town of Bridgton identifying the private portion of Salmon Point Road as a Private Way. While the two pre-existing handicapped spaces at Salmon Point will be maintained, the use of the private portion of Salmon Point Road will be limited to licensed or placarded handicap vehicles.

In a joint statement, both the residents of Salmon Point Road and the Town of Bridgton stated that “the agreement strikes a well-measured balance between providing access to the public facilities at Salmon Point while preserving the historic use of Salmon Point Road by local residents. We are happy to have been able to come up with an amicable solution that will increase the safety, accessibility and beauty of Bridgton’s public spaces for years to come.”

USDA Invests Over $46 million to Improve Wastewater Infrastructure for Three Maine Communities

USDA Rural Development State Director Timothy P. Hobbs said, “The investment of $46 million in three Maine wastewater systems will be of immense benefit to the communities who are served. These upgrades will modernize decades-old wastewater infrastructure, resulting in increased efficiencies, advancements in technology, and ensuring Maine’s environment is preserved for the people fortunate enough to call Maine home.”

Read the entire press release here:

https://www.rd.usda.gov/newsroom/news-release/usda-invests-over-46-million-improve-wastewater-infrastructure-three-maine

 

USDA RD Water and Waste Disposal Loans and Grant Program Project Announcement

USDA RD Project Announcement

This Rural Development investment will be used to rehabilitate the Town of Bridgton, Maine’s wastewater treatment system. The proposed project is to construct a new wastewater treatment facility, upgrade some aging sewer collection infrastructure, and to expand the system which will enable additional users in the greater downtown area to have access to public wastewater services. The expansion portion of the project is expected to add 448 new users, increasing the total number of users on the system from 207 to 655. The proposed project will focus on the wastewater system/facility as it is in need of immediate upgrades.

Some of the plant’s original equipment and processes are upwards of thirty-five years old, and the overall facility is well beyond the twenty-year useful life for which it was originally designed. The plant is now at an age where it has a greater chance of equipment failure and it has incurred increased maintenance needs. Several key unit processes at the plant are inefficient, inadequate, or obsolete. The rehabilitation improvements address the aging infrastructure and capacity issues in the project area, as well as restore the design capacity of the facility at a reasonable cost. The proposed upgrades, which are long overdue, will help the system operate more effectively and efficiently, as well as address the Maine Department of Environmental Protection health and sanitary concerns. The upgrades included in this project represent the highest priorities identified in the Town’s Strategic Plan and will have the greatest benefit to the distribution system. The proposed project is in an Agency identified target area. Rural Development staff have been working within the City over the past few years to extend our services and programs to help the City enhance its mission. The proposed project will not only correct the system’s current operating deficiencies, but also help the City improve their economic development opportunities.

The proposed project is a collaborative effort with funding provided by the Clean Water State Revolving Fund, the Town of Bridgton, and Rural Development. By working together all organizations are able to enhance their selection criteria and make their limited resources go further.

 

Other Funding:
$2,000,000 Clean Water State Revolving Fund
$443,000 Town of Bridgton

Total Project Cost: $20,880,000

Loan Term: 28 years @ 2.375%

Other Funding: Other: $2,443,000.00
Total Project Cost: $22,880,000.00

 

Bridgton’s rebranding campaign puts it on the map with young home buyers

So does branding really work?

Well, the town of Bridgton, ME, about 40 miles from the city of Portland, came up with the warm and fuzzy tagline “Love Always, Bridgton,” after working with PR firm Black Fly Media. The town of roughly 5,000 has an aging population, about half of them 45 or older, and about one-third of all homes are seasonal or second homes. Town leaders wanted to attract more year-round young families to keep the town vital.

A series of in-depth interviews with residents, business people, and town officials revealed that the town’s most cherished assets were its lakes, streams, and ski area, Shawnee Peak, and its affordability relative to Portland, says Black Fly Media’s Nelson.

“The most predominant thing that kept coming up is that people loved the town, for different reasons,” Nelson says.

Read the whole article here: https://www.realtor.com/news/trends/suburbs-try-branding-campaigns-woo-millennial-home-buyers/

 

 

Bridgton Awarded $11.5M in grants to Complete Three Critical Infrastructure Improvements

BRIDGTON, MAINE — October 1, 2018 —  The Town of Bridgton has been awarded significant funding to offset the costs for three major infrastructure improvements needed in town. The first is a replacement of the aging wastewater system, which has been failing since 2014. The other two projects include restoration and repair of two sections of Main Street. Municipal leaders applied for grants and loans from the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and Rural Development, United States Development of Agriculture (USDA) and have successfully reduced overall burden to taxpayers with a grant award for $11M for the wastewater project. The Maine Department of Transportation awarded the town $500,000 for the Main Street project.

“We’ve known for some time that the wastewater system is in critical need of replacement and we are very relieved to get this large grant,” says Bob Peabody, Bridgton Town Manager. Recent tests show that private systems are contaminating parts of Stevens Brook – threatening water quality and public safety. The Town’s system needs significant repairs and the DEP says it’s at risk for license violations. Peabody is concerned that if voters don’t approve Question 1 in November the Town will lose the federal funding and residents will end up footing the entire $22.8M price tag. The grant funding currently in place will cover 48-percent of this project’s total.

In 2017, The Town of Bridgton launched a marketing campaign to attract new businesses and year round residents to town, but has been forced to turn away several major retailers, restauranteurs and business because the failing wastewater system is operating at capacity.

“We have plans to develop a senior living campus in Bridgton but we cannot move forward unless the wastewater system is improved,” said Lon Walters, owner of Woodlands Senior Living, a Waterville-based senior and assisted living provider.” Walters says the communities to be built would serve 136 residents and create up to 80 new, permanent jobs in Bridgton.

Two other questions on Bridgton’s November ballot have also received significant state grant money. Two Main Street projects that will improve drainage systems and lighting, implement traffic calming measures, restore crumbling, legally non-compliant sidewalks on both Lower and Upper Main Street have received $500,000 from the Maine Department of Transportation. The improvements are dually aimed at improving safety and accessibility, while stimulating aesthetics to improve economic development. A petition supporting the projects circulated Main Street businesses and garnered several dozens of signatures.

For Deb Snyder, PhD, needed improvements on lower Main Street are a safety concern, adding that “it’s challenging and sometimes dangerous” for her wheelchair-bound daughter to get around on lower Main Street. Snyder, founding director of the HeartGlow Center, a special needs non-profit on Lower Main says the road and sidewalks have been neglected for years and repairs need to be done. “Storm drains are crumbling, potholes are problematic and the walk signals are too short to make it across Route 302 fast enough.”

The town put all three questions on the ballot in hopes that voters will approval all three together. Project engineers say simultaneous construction will create efficiencies that save money in labor and paving costs, and will minimize construction disruptions. Voters will decide each question individually.

To complete all three projects, the cost per household will be less than $100 dollars per year on a home valued at $150,000, according to Bridgton’s Assessor’s Agent. The cost breakdown, per $150k of value is $53 for Question 1; $31 for Question 2 (Upper Main) and $14 for Question 3 (Lower Main).

“The stars have aligned in Bridgton, as we have this impressive financial assistance package in place so for less than $100-dollars per year, residents will get more than $27M in capital improvements,” Peabody adds “the time is now for us to complete these long discussed projects.”

About Bridgton: Settled in 1770, Bridgton is now home to a 67-acre park right downtown, abundant water access, and regional destinations including Shawnee Peak, a handful of camping/RV sites, children’s camps, a drive-in theatre, a golf course, Bridgton Academy and Bridgton Hospital. https://bridgtonmaine.org

Press Inquiries: Diana Nelson, Black Fly Media, diana@blackflymedia.com 978.985.9993

Highland Lake Beach Testing

** MEDIA ANNOUNCEMENT **

Highland Lake Beach Testing
Town of Bridgton
Wednesday, August 1st,

This morning we received the test results for the water at Highland Lake Beach. The testing found that the water’s e.coliform count was well below the acceptable limit and Highland Lake Beach will be reopening.

We were made aware of this issue by our routine water testing and we will continue to monitor our public beaches on a regular basis till Labor Day to keep them safe for public use.

We will be opening Highland Lake Beach for swimming immediately.

Highland Lake Beach Closing

Highland Lake Beach Closing
Town of Bridgton
Friday August 10, 2018

Testing performed on 8/09 has indicated an e.coliform count above the acceptable limit at Highland Lake Beach. We will be closing Highland Lake Beach immediately to swimming. Highland Lake Beach will remain open for picnicking and the boat launch will also stay open. The Town will send out samples to be tested  on Monday and will post the results of the testing once we receive them.

Highland Lake Beach Testing

** MEDIA ANNOUNCEMENT **

Highland Lake Beach Testing
Town of Bridgton
Wednesday, August 1st, 

This morning we received the test results from the Paris Utility District for the water at Highland Lake Beach. The testing found that the water’s e.coliform count was well below the acceptable limit and Highland Lake Beach will be reopening.

We were made aware of this issue by our routine water testing and we will continue to monitor our public beaches on a regular basis till Labor Day to keep them safe for public use.

We will be opening Highland Lake Beach for swimming immediately.

Highland Lake Beach Closing

Highland Lake Beach Closing
Town of Bridgton
Tuesday, July 31st,

Testing performed on 7/30 has indicated an e.coliform count above the acceptable limit at Highland Lake Beach. We will be closing Highland Lake Beach immediately to swimming and will be moving the swimming lessons that are normally held at Highland Lake Beach to Salmon Point. Highland Lake Beach will remain open for picnicking and the boat launch will also stay open. The Town sent out samples to be tested today and will post the results of the testing once we receive them. An update will be posted on Facebook and our website by the end of the day tomorrow.

As of now, the cause of the high e.coliform count remains unknown but local fowl and low water levels may have played a role.

Woods Pond Beach Investigation Results

** MEDIA ANNOUNCEMENT **

Woods Pond Investigation Results
Town of Bridgton
Monday, July 23,

According to the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention, norovirus was found in two human stool specimens submitted for testing which confirms that this was a Norovirus outbreak. As of 7/19/18, epidemiologists have identified 97 people who reported being ill and were associated with this outbreak.

The CDC’s epidemiological investigation found that people who put their heads under the water while swimming or swallowed water while swimming were at greater risk for infection. Of note, there were several people who were not at the beach who became ill after caring for someone who was ill.

According to the CDC,

Norovirus is very contagious and spreads easily from person to person. It is common in Maine and throughout the U.S.

  • Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and stomach cramping.  Symptoms generally start 24-48 hours after swallowing the virus, though it can appear earlier than that. Illness is usually not serious though people can feel very sick.  Most people get better within 1-2 days.
  • There is no treatment.  If you feel unwell, consulting with your medical provider is recommended.
  • You can decrease your chance of getting ill by washing your hands often with soap and water, carefully washing fruits and vegetables, and thoroughly cleaning and disinfecting contaminated surfaces.”

A Norovirus Fact Sheet from the Maine CDC can be found at: https://bridgtonmaine.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Norovirus_FS_2017.pdf

Woods Pond Test Results

Woods Pond Test Results

Town of Bridgton

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

 This morning we received the test results from Paris Utility District, 7 C.N. Brown Way, South Paris Maine for the Woods Pond swim area.  Test results were 3 E.Coliform, acceptable limit is 235 therefore PASSED.

While testing, we opted to include the water from the sinks in the bathroom, which is not for drinking and signed as such.  This test failed.  Therefore, we have shut the water supply off to the bathroom sinks and have made available hand sanitizers.

We will be opening the beach for swimming immediately.

We want to thank the public for their patience and understanding while we worked through this process.

Woods Pond Beach Update

Woods Pond Beach Closure

We apologize for any confusion related to our original post. Here is the information available to us:

Late Friday afternoon, the Town of Bridgton received a phone call from the Center for Disease Control. The CDC reports that several people became ill with abdominal issues after swimming in Woods Pond between July 2 and July 6. The town closed the beach immediately.

The town is unable to sample the water and diagnose the cause until the testing facility reopens Monday morning, July 9. We will provide an update as soon as we have more information.

Until then, please do not use Woods Pond and instead visit Highland Lake Beach, Sabatis Island and Salmon Point.


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Press Release: Household Characteristic Survey to Inform Wastewater Expansion

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BRIDGTON, Maine — August 4, 2017 — The Town of Bridgton is preparing to expand the capacity and upgrade its existing wastewater collection, treatment and treated effluent infrastructure, and is conducting a household characteristic survey to inform the process.

The existing sewer collection system will be expanded throughout the Downtown area and the Portland Road (Route 302) corridor. The project description and report is available to review at the town office. It includes a description of why the Town needs this infrastructure project, a discussion of potential technology, the location of current and future infrastructure and the potential users to be served.

The many critical reasons needs for this project include increasing demand, age and deteriorating condition of the existing infrastructure, impacts to surface water bodies and regulatory violations. The current system requires investment to meet the needs of the Bridgton community and to provide proper treatment of wastewater.  The existing pump stations are old and need upgrades to equipment and electrical systems.  The project will fix known deficiencies in piping including sags, offset joints and breaks.    Finally, the presence of poor soils in the area has made the use of private septic systems challenging, as they have historically experienced non-compliance. Under this project, private septic systems will not be required for users who connect to the sewer.

The Town officials, Woodard & Curran engineers and RCAP Solutions are working together with USDA Rural Development and Maine DEP to identify funding solutions.  A household survey will help in understanding the best approach to funding the project, and ensure that we represent all potential residential users’ financial circumstances adequately.  Therefore, we are surveying all potential residential users to have a more accurate determination of household income. This data will be evaluated only to determine if the project qualifies for federal financial assistance which is based on the median household income of the entire service area.    Your voluntary and full participation will greatly assist the town in ensuring the projects’ affordability for everyone.

Under the guidance of RCAP Solutions, Jamie McFaul will be conducting the survey.  This information will be complied by Arthur Astarita Maine State Lead for RCAP Solutions, the northeast affiliate of the Rural Community Assistance Partnership (www.rcapsolutions.org).   All information will be held in strictly confidence by RCAP Solutions.  If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Art at 232.3388 or Jamie at 517.7020.