The Bridgton Police Department is hiring for a full-time officer! See job openings for a description and to apply!

2020 Police Cruiser Bid/Proposal Package-Open until August 2nd at 2pm

EMERGENCY 911

Non-emergency: 207-647-8814

Richard B. Stillman

Police Chief

Ashley Bedard

Admin Assistant

Patrol Officers

Sergeant Timothy “TJ” Reese
treese@bridgtonmaine.org

Sergeant Phillip Jones
pjones@bridgtonmaine.org

Officer Joshua E. Muise
jmuise@bridgtonmaine.org

Officer Todd Smolinsky
tsmolinski@bridgtonmaine.org

Officer Craig J. Hammond
chammond@bridgtonmaine.org

Officer Sophia Swiatek
sswiatek@bridgtonmaine.org

Reserve Patrol Officers

Officer Brandan George

Officer Michael Chaine

Officer Ovide V. Richard

Animal Control Officers

Carl Hoskins

Jack Knight

Park Ranger

Seasonal (June-August)

?

I want to . . .

  • Dispose of Drugs

    Our Disposal box is located in the Police Department Lobby and available M-F 8am-430pm. We take all medications, but do NOT take any type of needles or syringes. Please ask your doctor’s office about disposal of those. This is completely confidential and no labels need to be peeled or blacked out.

  • Complete a Statement

    To complete a statement, print this form, fill it out, and turn it in to the PD.

  • Get a crash or law report

    1. Fill out the form below
    2. Wait 3 business days
    3. Pick up your report at the police station for a fee of $5 per law report or $25 per crash report. We accept exact cash or checks made out to Town of Bridgton. We are not able to accept credit/debit cards at this time.

    [recaptcha]


  • Get fingerprinted

    We do fingerprinting on an “as available” basis, meaning that we do allow walk-in requests, but the completion of these are based on an officer’s availability. If they should be on a call, for one example, then they are not able to complete the fingerprinting at that time. We do not make appointments, as they are impossible to keep based on calls. Office hours are M-F from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. There is a $15 fee for non-residents and a $5 fee for residents, which covers up to 5 cards. After 5 cards, there may be an additional fee charged. We ask that you bring in exact cash or a check made out to “Town of Bridgton” as we don’t accept credit/debit cards at this time.

  • Report an incident/accident

    If this is not an emergency, please call our dispatch office at 647-8814 to report your incident. If this is an emergency, please dial 911.

  • Pay a Traffic Ticket

    To pay any Maine traffic ticket, visit Paytixx online. We do not accept payment for traffic tickets at the Police Department.

  • Pay Court Fines & Fees

    To pay Maine court fines or fees, visit the State of Maine court fee site.

  • Eyewitness Identification Policy

    BRIDGTON POLICE DEPARTMENT  POLICY

     SUBJECT:  BRIDGTON POLICE DEPARTMENT              NUMBER:  03-23

    EYEWITNESS IDENTIFICATION

     

    EFFECTIVE DATE:               03/26/2019                              REVIEW DATE: 03/19/2024

    Amends/Supersedes:             02/01/2016

     

    APPROVED: ___________________

    Richard B. Stillman

    Chief of Police

     

    1. general considerations and guidelines

    Police identification procedures are an important consideration for establishing the identity of a criminal offender.  They are equally significant in clearing an innocent suspect.  The police must, therefore, be careful to ensure that their eyewitness identification procedures are not conducted in an unnecessarily or impermissibly suggestive manner and that they do not contribute to mistaken identification.

    Many people who have been convicted of serious crimes, only to later be exonerated by scientific evidence, were originally convicted based in large part on mistaken identification by a witness.  Eyewitness misidentification is the single greatest cause of wrongful convictions nationwide, playing a role in over 75% of convictions overturned through DNA testing.[1]  This department recognizes that it is as much the responsibility of the police to protect the innocent from conviction as it is to assist in the conviction of the guilty.

    The identification of criminal offenders must be approached with extreme caution as the court may exclude evidence if it is improperly obtained.  If improper identification procedures are used, a court may not only exclude the out-of-court identification, but can also, in certain circumstances, exclude subsequent in-court identification.  The court will carefully examine the identification procedure and the manner in which it was conducted to determine whether the police influenced the witness, intentionally or unintentionally.

    1. policy

    It is the policy of the Bridgton Police Department that:

     

    1. An officer may show a single photograph of a suspect to a witness for the purpose of confirming the suspect’s identity in a case where the suspect and witness know each other.

     

    1. Eyewitnesses will be given specific instructions prior to being shown a suspect.

     

    1. Photo arrays and line-ups will be conducted by displaying the suspect and fillers sequentially.

     

    1. Photos arrays, line-ups, and voice identifications will be conducted using blind administration.

     

    1. When an eyewitness identifies a suspect, the officer will immediately ask the witness how certain he or she is of the identification.

     

    1. The Department will avoid multiple identification procedures featuring any one suspect with the same witness.

     

    1. The Department does not use composites, and the use of artist sketches is only permitted under strict guidelines.

     

    1. If an eyewitness identifies a suspect, officers will attempt to gather additional evidence to confirm or dispel the identification.

     

    1. The Department will provide training in eyewitness identification to all sworn personnel.

     

    1. Definitions
      1. Suspect: A person who officers believe may have committed the crime.
      2. Offender: The perpetrator of the crime.
      3. Filler: A person, or photograph of a person, that is included in a line-up or photo array but who is not a suspect.
      4. Show-up: The presentation of one suspect to an eyewitness in a short time frame following the commission of a crime.
      5. Field View: The exposure of an eyewitness to a group of people in a public place on the theory that the subject may be among the group. A field view differs from a show-up in that it may be conducted well after the commission of the crime and may be conducted with or without a suspect in the group.
      6. Photo Array: The showing of several photographs of different individuals to an eyewitness for the purpose of obtaining an identification.
      7. Lineup: The live presentation of several individuals to an eyewitness for the purpose of obtaining an identification. A line-up differs from a field view in that it is conducted in a controlled setting, such as a police station, a known suspect is in the mix, and the participants are aware that an identification procedure is being conducted.
      8. Voice Lineup: The presentation of several individuals to a witness for the purpose of obtaining an identification of a suspect’s voice.
      9. Blind Administration: A procedure whereby the officer showing a photo array or conducting a line-up cannot tell when the witness is viewing the suspect.
    2. procedureS
      1. General Considerations
        1. Prior to conducting an identification procedure, officers should take from the witness and document a full description of the offender.
        2. If practicable, the officer should record the procedure and the witness’ statement of certainty. If not, the officer should jot down the witness’ exact words and incorporate them into his/her report.
        3. A report of every show-up, photo array, line-up or voice or other identification procedure, whether an identification is made or not, shall be submitted. The report shall include a summary of the procedure, the persons who were present for it, instructions given to the witness by the officer (this should be accomplished by submitting the appropriate witness instruction form), any statement or reaction by the witness, and any comments made by the witness regarding the identification procedure.
        4. A suspect should be viewed by one witness at a time and out of the presence or hearing of other witnesses. Witnesses who have viewed the suspect should not be permitted to communicate with those who have not until the identification procedure is completed.
      2. Whenever practicable, an officer conducting an identification procedure should read the witness a set of instructions from a departmental form (show-up card, or photo array or line-up instruction form, etc.). Those instructions should include the following:
    3. The person who committed the crime may or may not be (the person, or in the set of photographs, etc.) you are about to view or listen to.

     

    1. You should remember that it is just as important to clear innocent persons from suspicion as to identify the guilty.

     

    1. The individuals you view may not appear exactly as they did on the date of the incident because features such as head and facial hair are subject to change. (Not for use during show-ups or voice identifications.)

     

    1. Regardless of whether or not you select someone, the police department will continue to investigate the incident.

     

    1. The procedure requires the officer to ask you to state, in your own words and without using a numerical scale, how certain you are of any identification.

     

    1. If you do select someone, please do not ask the officer questions about the person you have selected, as no information can be shared with you at this stage of the investigation.

     

    1. Regardless of whether you select a person, please do not discuss the procedure with any other witnesses in the case.

     

    1. Right to Counsel During Identification Procedure
      1. There is no requirement for an attorney to be present when an identification in the field is made of a suspect who has been apprehended during the period immediately after the commission of a crime. Immediately is generally considered to be within two hours or so.
      2. There is no right to counsel under circumstances where an identification takes place accidentally, i.e., in a manner that was not contrived, planned, or anticipated by the police.
      3. There is no right to counsel for identification procedures involving photographs or composite drawings, whether conducted before or after the initiation of adversarial criminal proceedings.
      4. Right to counsel begins when any “adversarial judicial proceeding” has been initiated “whether commenced by way of formal charge, preliminary hearing, indictment, information, or arraignment.”
        1. Once a suspect has been arraigned or indicted, his/her right to have counsel present at any in-person identification procedure attaches.
        2. No right to the presence of counsel exists prior to, or simply because a complaint has been filed, even if an arrest warrant has issued.

    Witness Instructions

     

    Whenever practicable, an officer conducting an identification procedure shall read the witness a set of instructions from a departmental form (show-up card, or photo array or line-up instruction form).  Those instructions include the following:

     

    1. The person who committed the crime may or may not be (the person, or in the set of photographs) you are about to view.

     

    1. It is just as important to clear innocent persons from suspicion as to identify the guilty.

     

    1. The individuals you view may not appear exactly as they did on the date of the incident because features such as head and facial hair are subject to change. (Not for use during show-ups or voice identifications.)

     

    1. Regardless of whether or not you select someone, the police department will continue to investigate the incident.

     

    1. The procedure requires the officer to ask you to state, in your own words and without using a numerical scale, how certain you are of any identification.

     

    1. If you do select someone, please do not ask the officer questions about the person you have selected, as no information can be shared with you at this stage of the investigation.

     

    1. Regardless of whether you select a person, please do not discuss the procedure with any other witnesses in the case.

    Show-ups

     

    1. Detaining a suspect who fits the description of an offender in order to arrange a show-up is lawful where the officer has reasonable suspicion that the suspect has committed a crime, even if probable cause to arrest has not yet developed.

     

    1. A show-up should not be conducted more than two hours after the witness’s observation of the offender. Show-ups should be conducted live whenever possible and not photographically.  Officers should not attempt to obtain identifications using RMV photos on the computers in their cruisers, unless a dire emergency exists.

     

    1. When a show-up is arranged in an emergency situation, where either a witness or a victim is in imminent danger of death or in critical condition in a hospital, for example, and the circumstances are such that an immediate confrontation is imperative, the emergency identification procedure shall be conducted in a non-suggestive manner.

     

    1. Every show-up must be as fair and non-suggestive as possible.  Specifically, if the suspect is handcuffed, he should be positioned so that the handcuffs are not visible to the witness. Show-ups should not be conducted if the suspect is seated in the rear of a police cruiser, in a cell, or in any other enclosure associated with custody.

     

    1. If the witness(es) fail(s) to make a positive identification, and sufficient other evidence has not developed to provide probable cause to make an arrest, the suspect must be permitted to leave.  His identity should be recorded and included in the officer’s report.

     

    1. A suspect stopped within a short time after the commission of the crime may be taken to a location where he can be viewed by a witness for possible identification or be detained at the site of the stop and the witness taken there to view him.  Transporting the witness to the site of the stop is preferred if circumstances permit.

     

    1. Suspects should not be brought into a crime scene as contamination may result.  For the same reason, clothing articles found at the crime scene should not be placed on or in contact with a suspect.  A suspect should not be brought back to the home of a victim or witness unless that was the scene of the crime.

     

    1. Police officers must not do or say anything that may convey to the witnesses that they have evidence of the suspect’s guilt.  Officers should turn down their radios to reduce the likelihood that the witness they are transporting may overhear information about the stop of the suspect.

     

    1. The suspect should be viewed by one witness at a time and out of the presence or hearing of other witnesses.  Witnesses who have viewed the suspect should not be permitted to communicate with those who have not until the identification procedure is completed.

     

    1. Once a witness has positively identified the suspect at a show-up, officers should not conduct additional show-ups with the same suspect. Subsequent identifications may be attempted by means of a photo array or line-up.

     

    1. Officers may transport victims or witnesses in police vehicles to cruise the area where a crime has just occurred in order for them to attempt to point out the offender.  While checking the area, officers must be careful not to make any statements or comments to the witnesses which could be considered suggestive.

     

    1. Officers should make written notes of any identifications and any statements made by witnesses at the time of confrontation with the suspect.  Once a witness has indicated his opinion that the suspect is the offender, the officer should ask the witness how certain he is of the identification.  Officers should ask the witness not to use a numerical scale, but rather to indicate certainty in his own words.  All statements by the witnesses should be incorporated into the officers’ report.

    Preparing a Photo Array

     

    1. When assembling a photo array, officers should endeavor to use a current and accurate photograph of the suspect. They should select filler photographs based on their similarity to the witness’s description of the offender, not to the appearance of the suspect. Nothing about the suspect or his photo should make him stand out.

     

    1. An array should contain five fillers and only one suspect photograph. All photographs should be of the same general size and basic composition.  Officers must not repeat fillers with the same witness from one array to next and should mark the back of each photo with numbers one through eight.  None of the photos may bear markings indicating previous arrests.

     

    1. If the suspect has a unique or unusual feature, such as facial scars or severe injuries, the officer preparing the array should create a consistent appearance between the suspect and fillers by adding the feature to the fillers or by covering the area on every photograph.

     

    1. Once the array has been assembled, the officer should examine it to ensure that nothing about the suspect’s photo makes him unduly stand out.

     

     
     
    Showing a Photo Array

     

    1. The showing of a photo array must be conducted in a manner that promotes reliability, fairness and objectivity.

     

    1. Whenever practicable, officers should videotape or audiotape the showing of a photo array.

     

    1. Each witness must view the photographs independently and out of the presence and hearing of the other witnesses.

     

    1. Officers must avoid suggestive statements that may influence the judgment or perception of the witness.

     

    1. A second officer who is unaware of which photograph depicts the suspect, known as a blind administrator, should actually show the photographs to the witness.  This technique, called double-blind administration, is intended to ensure that the witness does not interpret a gesture or facial expression by the officer as an indication as to the identity of the suspect.  It also allows the prosecution to demonstrate to the judge or jury that it was impossible for the officer showing the photographs to indicate to the witness, intentionally or unintentionally, which photograph he/she should select.

     

    1. If it is not practicable to use double-blind administration, a blinded technique such as the folder shuffle should be used.  In all cases, officers shall employ techniques that ensure that no officer present for the showing of an array can tell when the witness is viewing a photograph of the suspect.

     

    1. The investigating officer or the second officer (the administrator) should carefully instruct the witness by reading from a departmental Photo Array Instruction Form, and the witness should be asked to sign the form indicating that he understands the instructions.  The investigating officer and the administrator should also sign and date the form.

     

    1. When the double-blind technique is used, the officers should explain to the witness that the officer showing the array does not know the identity of the people in the photographs.

     

    1. The officer shall show the photographs to the witness one at a time and ask the witness whether or not he recognizes the person.

     

    1. When the witness signals for the next photograph, the officer should move the first photograph so that it is out of sight and ask the witness whether he recognizes the next photograph.  The procedure should be repeated until the witness has viewed each photograph.

     

    1. If the witness identifies a photograph, the officer should ask the witness how certain he is of the identification.  Officers should ask the witness not to use a numerical scale, but rather his own words.

     

    1. If the witness identifies a photograph before all the photographs have been viewed, the officer should remind the witness that he is required to show the rest of the photographs.

     

    1. Witnesses who ask to see a photo or line-up participant a second time should be shown the entire array or lineup. Array or lineups shall not be shown more than two times.

     

    1. The photo array should be preserved as evidence in the same order as when the identification was made.

     

    1. If more than one witness is to view an array and a witness has already marked one of the photos, a separate unmarked array shall be used for each subsequent witness.

     

    1. When an officer is showing a photographic array or lineup to a subsequent witness in the same investigation, officers should shuffle the order to demonstrate that there could be no collusion between the two witnesses.

    Line-ups

     

    1. Line-ups shall be conducted under the direction of a detective supervisor, or in his absence the Chief of Police, and when feasible, after consultation with the District Attorney’s Office.

     

    1. A suspect cannot be detained and compelled to participate in a line-up without probable cause to arrest. If a suspect refuses to participate in a line-up, the District Attorney’s Office may be asked to apply for a court order to compel the suspect to cooperate.

     

    1. Before any suspect who has been arraigned or indicted is shown to eyewitnesses in a line-up, or other live identification procedure, he must be informed of his right to have an attorney present at the line-up and of his right to be provided with an attorney without cost if he is unable to afford legal counsel. Unless a valid waiver is voluntarily and knowingly made, in writing if possible, no such identification may proceed without the presence of the suspect’s attorney.

     

    1. Officers must select a group of at least five fillers who fit the description of the offender as provided by the witness(es). Because the line-up will be administered by an officer who does not know the identity of the suspect, the fillers selected should not be known to the officer administering the line-up.  In selecting line-up fillers, abide by the guidelines for photo array fillers as described above.

     

    1. The suspect should be viewed by one witness at a time and out of the presence or hearing of other witnesses. Witnesses who have viewed the suspect should not be permitted to communicate with those who have not until the identification procedure is completed.

     

    1. All persons in the line-up should carry cards that identify them only by number and should be referred to only by their number. As with photo arrays, each witness must view the line-up independently, out of the presence and hearing of the other witnesses.

     

    1. The investigating officer should explain to the witness that a second officer (the line-up administrator) will be conducting the line-up, and that the administrator does not know the identity of the people participating.

     

    1. The investigating officer must carefully instruct the witness by reading from a departmental Line-up Instruction Form, and the witness should be asked to sign the form indicating that he understands the instructions. The officer should also sign and date the form.

     

    1. The investigating officer must leave the room while the line-up administrator conducts the line-up.

     

    1. The line-up should be conducted so that the suspect and fillers do not actually line up, but rather so that they are displayed to the witness one at a time. This can be accomplished by having them enter the room individually and leave before the next one enters.

     

    1. The procedure for showing the participants to the witness and for obtaining a statement of certainty is the same as for photo arrays. Whenever practicable, the police should videotape or audiotape a line-up.

     

    1. When an attorney for the suspect is present, the attorney should be permitted to make reasonable suggestions regarding the composition of the line-up and the manner in which it is to be conducted. Any suggestions made by the suspect’s attorney, and any actions taken by the officer on those suggestions, should be included as part of the line-up report.

     

    1. Counsel representing the suspect should be afforded sufficient time to confer with his client prior to the line-up. Once the line-up has commenced, attorneys should function primarily as observers, and should not be permitted to converse with the line-up participants, or with the witnesses, while the line-up is underway. The concept of blind administration requires that no one be present who knows the identity of the suspect.  For this reason, the any attorney who knows the suspect should leave the room before the line-up begins.  An attorney who does not know the suspect may attend the line-up on behalf of defense counsel or the assistant district attorney.

     

    1. The suspect’s attorney is not legally entitled to the names or addresses of the witnesses attending a line-up if the suspect has not yet been arraigned or indicted.[2] If the suspect’s attorney insists on having information about line-up witnesses, they should be advised to contact the District Attorney’s Office.

     

    1. During a line-up, each participant may be directed to wear certain clothing, to put on or take off certain clothing, to take certain positions, or to walk or move in a certain way.[3] If officers ask the participants to wear an article of clothing, they must guard against circumstances where the article only fits the suspect. All line-up participants shall be asked to perform the same actions.

     

    1. Line-up participants must not speak during the line-up. If identification of the suspect’s voice is desired, a separate procedure must be conducted. (See section on Voice Identification below.)

     

    1. After a person has been arrested, he may be required to participate in a line-up regarding the crime for which he was arrested.[4] After arrest, a suspect may lawfully refuse to participate in a line-up only if he has a right to have counsel present (post arraignment/indictment) and counsel is absent through no fault of the suspect or his attorney.

    Voice Identification

     

    1. Although considerably less common than visual identifications, voice identifications may be helpful to criminal investigations where the victim or witness was blind, the crime took place in the dark, the subject was masked, the witness’s eyes were covered by the perpetrator, or they were never in the same room with the perpetrator but heard his voice. If officers wish to conduct a voice identification procedure with a witness who also saw the subject, they must first consult with a detective supervisor, or in his absence the Chief of Police and, when feasible, the District Attorney’s Office.

     

    1. As with any in-person identification or confrontation, if the suspect has been arraigned or indicted, he has a right to the presence of counsel at the voice identification procedure.

     

    1. Where a voice identification is attempted, the following procedures should be employed to the extent possible:

     

    1. As in a line-up, there should be at least six persons whose voices will be listened to by the witness; one-on-one confrontations should be avoided. Because line-ups will be administered by an officer who does not know the identity of the suspect, the fillers should not be known to the officer administering the procedure;

     

    1. The suspect and other participants shall not be visible to the witness; this can be done by using a partition, or by similar means;

     

    1. All participants, including the suspect, shall be instructed to speak the same words in the same order;

     

    1. The words recited by the participants shall not be the ones spoken by the offender during the crime; the line-up participants should speak neutral words in a normal tone of voice;

     

    1. When both a visual and voice line-up are conducted, the witness should be informed that the line-up participants will be called in a different order and by different numbers;

     

    1. If there are two or more suspects of a particular crime, officers must present each suspect to witnesses in separate line-ups. Different fillers should be used to compose each line-up.

     

    1. As with any identification procedure, police officers should avoid any words or actions that suggest to the voice witness that a positive identification is expected, or who they expect the witness to identify.

     

    1. The investigating officer should carefully instruct the witness by reading from a departmental Voice Identification Line-up Instruction Form, and the witness should be asked to sign the form indicating that he understands the instructions. The officer should also sign and date the form.  Whenever practicable, officers should videotape or audiotape the procedure.

     

    1. Officers must adhere to the principles of blind administration as described above. As is the case with photo arrays and line-ups, the investigating officer must leave the room while the administrator conducts the procedure.

    Courtroom Identification

     

    Prior to conducting any courtroom identification procedure, officers should consult the District Attorney’s Office.  The same right to an attorney, and the same due process considerations that apply to all other identification procedures also apply to courtroom identifications.

     

    If the suspect has been arraigned or indicted, he has a right to have counsel present at any in-person identification.  Live confrontations, and informal viewings of the suspect by witnesses, must be conducted in such a manner as to minimize any undue suggestiveness.

    Sketches and Composites

     

    An artist’s sketch, computerized drawing, composite, or other depiction can sometimes aid an investigation, but are most effective when a witness has a good recollection of the offender’s facial features.  However, research suggests that building a composite can reduce a witness’s accuracy for identifying the original face.[5]

     

    For these reasons, the Department does not employ composites in criminal investigations and the use of sketches is severely restricted.  No officer may arrange for an artist’s sketch except under the following circumstances:

     

    1. Any sketch must be prepared by a trained artist;

     

    1. A sketch may only be authorized by a Sergeant or the Chief of Police;

     

    1. A sketch may only be employed with a witness who provides a clear description of specific facial features;

     

    1. A sketch should not be attempted immediately prior to the showing of a photo array or line-up;

     

    1. Once the sketch has been completed, the witness should be asked to state in his own words how accurately it reflects how the suspect appeared during the crime;

     

    1. The fact that a suspect resembles a sketch or composite is not, without more, probable cause to believe that the suspect is the offender; and

     

    1. A report must be submitted regarding any sketch procedure.
     
    Mug Shots

     

    Officers will not show large numbers of random photographs to eyewitnesses.  If officers decide to show photographs of people from a particular group who are suspected of involvement in the offense, but where no specific suspect has emerged, the following guidelines shall be followed:

     

    1. Officers will ensure there is only one photograph of each individual;

     

    1. Officers shall not refer to the photographs as “mug shots”;

     

    1. If photographs of various formats are used, officers will ensure that several of each format are used;

     

    1. The witness’s attention should not be drawn to any particular photograph;

     

    1. A report shall be filed following the procedure, regardless of whether identification is made.  The report should describe the photographs viewed by the witness(s).

     

    1. Officers should be extremely cautious before charging a suspect based on this type of identification alone.

     

     

     

     

     

    Inanimate Objects

     

    Officers who seek to have an eyewitness identify an inanimate object should adhere to the following procedures:

     

    1. An identification of an inanimate object must be conducted in a nonsuggestive manner, and officers must not make extraneous remarks or provide information to the witness about the circumstances surrounding the discovery of the object;

     

    1. It is permissible to show a witness a single object or a photo of the object, so an array of objects is not required, but an officer might elect to conduct an object lineup to avoid an allegation of a suggestive procedure, especially if identification of an object effectively identifies the defendant as the offender;

     

    1. The officer should document the witness’s complete description of the object before the object or a photograph of it is shown to the witness;

     

    1. The officer should tell the witness that objects will be shown, and that they may or may not be the object the witness described;

     

    1. Where any identification is made, the officer should ask the witness to state, in his or her own words, how certain he or she is of the identification;

     

    1. The officer should obtain clarification from the witness as to whether the object is the actual object he or she saw, whether it simply looks like the object he or she saw, or whether the witness is unsure;

     

    1. If a piece of clothing similar to that described by a witness is found in the area where a suspect has been stopped, the article should not be placed on the suspect prior to a show-up.  Rather, a show-up should be conducted first, and identification of the clothing item afterwards; and

     

    1. Whenever practicable, the officer should videotape or audiotape the identification of an inanimate object.  If not, the officer should write down the witness’ exact words and incorporate them into his report.

     

     

    Appendix A

    Guidelines for an Effective Show-up:

     

    A show-up should be conducted shortly after the commission of the crime or the witness’ observation of the suspect.  A person should only be detained when the officer has reasonable suspicion to believe the person could be a suspect.

    Barring special circumstances, the witness should be transported to the suspect’s location.  When transporting a witness to a show-up, attempt to prevent the witness from hearing radio transmissions or other officer-to-officer conversations related to the suspect or the investigation.

    A suspect should only be viewed by one witness at a time out of the presence and hearing of other witnesses.  Talking among witnesses should not be allowed.

    Minimize suggestiveness.  Unless necessary for the safety of officers or others, show-ups should not be conducted if the suspect is seated in the rear of a police cruiser, in a cell, or in any other enclosure associated with custody.  If the suspect is handcuffed, he should be turned so that the handcuffs are not visible to the witness.

    Do not tell the witness where the suspect was found, whether the suspect said anything or did anything suspicious, or whether the suspect was found with items potentially related to the crime.

    Once a witness has positively identified the suspect at a show-up, do not conduct additional show-ups with the same suspect.

    If the witness fails to make an identification, or is not sure of an identification, and probable cause to arrest cannot be immediately developed, the person must be permitted to leave.

    Instructions to be read aloud to the witness:

    1. You are going to be asked to view some people (even if only one person is shown).
    2. The person you saw may or may not be among the people you are about to view.
    3. It is just as important to clear innocent persons from suspicion as it is to identify the guilty.
    4. Regardless of whether or not you identify the person, we will continue to investigate the incident.
    5. If you identify someone, I will ask you to state, in your own words, how certain you are.
    6. If you do select someone, please do not ask us questions about the person you have selected, because we cannot share that information with you at this time.
    7. Regardless of whether you select a person, please do not discuss the procedure with any other witnesses in the case.
    8. Do you have any questions before we begin?

    If an identification is made, ask:

    “Without using a numerical scale, how certain are you?

     

    Appendix B                                    

    Photo Array Instruction Form

     

    1. You are being asked to view a set of photographs.

     

    1. You will be viewing the photographs one at a time and in random order.

     

    1. Please look at all of them. I am required to show you the entire series.

     

    1. Please make a decision about each photograph before moving on to the next one.

     

    1. The person you saw may or may not be in the set of photographs you are about to view.

     

    1. You should remember that it is just as important to clear innocent persons from suspicion as to identify the guilty.

     

    1. The officer showing the photographs does not know whether any of the people in the array are the person you saw.

     

    1. The individuals in the photographs may not appear exactly as they did on the date of the incident because features such as head and facial hair are subject to change.

     

    1. Regardless of whether or not you select a photograph, the police department will continue to investigate the incident.

     

    1. If you select someone, the procedure requires the officer to ask you to state, in your own words, how certain you are.

     

    1. If you do select a photograph(s), please do not ask the officer questions about the person you have selected, as no information can be shared with you at this stage of the investigation.

     

    1. Regardless of whether you select a photograph(s), please do not discuss the procedure with any other witnesses in the case or the media.

     

    1. Do you have any questions before we begin?

     

    Witness Signature                                                                    Date  _____________

     

    Officer Signature                                                                     Date  _____________

     

    Administrator Signature                                                           Date  _____________

     

     

    If an identification is made:

     

    “Without using a numeric scale, tell me how certain you are.”

     

    Appendix C

    Lineup Instruction Form

     

    1. You are being asked to view a group of people.

     

    1. You will be viewing them one at a time in random order.

     

    1. Please look at all of them. I am required to show you the entire series.

     

    1. Please make a decision about each person before moving onto the next one.

     

    1. The person who you saw may or may not be one of the people you are about to view.

     

    1. You should remember that it is just as important to clear innocent persons from suspicion as to identify the guilty.

     

    1. The officer who will be administering the line-up does not know whether any of the people in the line-up are the person you saw.

     

    1. The individuals you view may not appear exactly as they did on the date of the incident because features such as head and facial hair are subject to change.

     

    1. Regardless of whether or not you select someone, the police department will continue to investigate the incident.

     

    1. If you select someone, the procedure requires the officer to ask you to state, in your own words, how certain you are.

     

    1. If you do select someone, please do not ask the officer questions about the person you have selected.

     

    1. Regardless of whether you select someone, please do not discuss the procedure with any other witnesses in the case or the media.

     

    1. Do you have any questions before we begin?

     

    Witness Signature:                                                          Date:  _____________

     

    Officer Signature:                                                            Date:  _____________

     

    Administrator Signature:                                                 Date:   _____________

     

     

    If an identification is made:

     

    Without using a numeric scale, tell me how certain you are.

    Appendix D

    Voice Identification Line-up Instruction Form

     

    1. You are being asked to listen to several people speak.

     

    1. You will be hearing them one at a time and in random order.

     

    1. Please listen to all of them.  I am required to present you the entire series.

     

    1. Please make a decision about each person before moving on to the next one.

     

    1. The person you heard may or may not be one of the people you are about to hear.

     

    1. You should remember that it is just as important to clear innocent persons from suspicion as to identify the guilty.

     

    1. The officer administering this procedure does not know whether any of the people are the person you heard.

     

    1. Please pay no attention to the content of the words spoken.  They have been chosen at random.

     

    1. Regardless of whether or not you select a person, the police department will continue to investigate the incident.

     

    1. If you select someone, the procedure requires the officer to ask you to state, in your own words, how certain you are.

     

    1. If you do select someone, please do not ask the officer questions about the person you have selected, as no information can be shared with you at this stage of the investigation.

     

    1. Regardless of whether you select a person, please do not discuss the procedure with any other witnesses in the case.

     

    1. Do you have any questions before we begin?

     

    Witness Signature: ________________________         Date: _____________

     

    Officer Signature: _________________________         Date:  _____________

     

    Administrator Signature: __________________          Date:  _____________

     

    If an identification is made:

     

    “Without using a numeric scale, tell me how certain you are.”

    [1] The Innocence Project (last visited Oct. 28, 2013)

    [2] U.S. v. Wade, 388 U.S. 218 (1967)

    [3] Id.

    [4] Id.

    [5] Gary L. Wells, Steve D. Charman, Elizabeth A. Olson, Building Face Composite Can Harm Lineup Identification Performance, Journal of Experimental Psychology (2005)

Bridgton PD Info

  • Forms, Permits, & Applications
  • Mission & Code of Ethics
  • Mission Statement

    It is the mission of the Bridgton Police Department to safeguard the lives and property of the people we serve with integrity, to reduce crime and the fear of crime, and to enhance the quality of life in our town by working in partnership with the community.

    Code of Ethics

    As a law enforcement officer, my fundamental duty is to serve the community; to safeguard lives and property; to protect the innocent against deception, the weak against oppression or intimidation and the peaceful against violence or disorder; and to respect the constitutional rights of all to liberty, equality and justice.

    I will keep my private life unsullied as an example to all and will behave in a manner that does not bring discredit to me or to my agency. I will maintain courageous calm in the face of danger, scorn or ridicule; develop self-restraint; and be constantly mindful of the welfare of others. Honest in thought and deed both in my personal and official life, I will be exemplary in obeying the law and the regulations of my department. Whatever I see or hear of a confidential nature or that is confided to me in my official capacity will be kept ever secret unless revelation is necessary in the performance of my duty.

    I will never act officiously or permit personal feelings, prejudices, political beliefs, aspirations, animosities or friendships to influence my decisions. With no compromise for crime and with relentless prosecution of criminals, I will enforce the law courteously and appropriately without fear or favor, malice or ill will, never employing unnecessary force or violence and never accepting gratuities.

    I recognize the badge of my office as a symbol of public faith, and I accept it as a public trust to be held so long as I am true to the ethics of police service. I will never engage in acts of corruption or bribery, nor will I condone such acts by other police officers. I will cooperate with all legally authorized agencies and their representatives in the pursuit of justice.

    I know that I alone am responsible for my own standard of professional performance and will take every reasonable opportunity to enhance and improve my level of knowledge and competence.

    I will constantly strive to achieve these objectives and ideals, dedicating myself before God to my chosen profession . . . law enforcement.

Blog Posts & Photo Galleries

Social Media